2nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 340,210 notes

Mungo Thomson - Negative Space (2006)

Source: likeafieldmouse

2nd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 403,489 notes

hunnnnie:

meladoodle:

WHAT

…… An elephant is more talented than me.

hunnnnie:

meladoodle:

WHAT

…… An elephant is more talented than me.

Source: ForGIFs.com

1st April 2014

Photo reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 155,135 notes

Source: de-cate

1st April 2014

Photo reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 175,120 notes

l-eedle:

thiscorpsofbrothers:

danisnotonfire:


Opening a beer with a frisbee.

dude

this is the most bro thing ever

Welcome to college

l-eedle:

thiscorpsofbrothers:

danisnotonfire:

Opening a beer with a frisbee.

dude

this is the most bro thing ever

Welcome to college

Source: 4gifs

1st April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 179,412 notes

wonderous-world:

Biddy is a 2-year old male African Pygmy hedgehog who goes on amazing adventures with the help of his people parents Thomas and Toni. He goes all over the place and if you want to see more of him and his travels check out his Instagram!

Source: wonderous-world

1st March 2014

Post reblogged from still eating oranges with 10,492 notes

The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general—arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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7th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Wandering Lost and Free with 107,438 notes

edwardspoonhands:

liamdryden:

hermionejg:

asammyg:

Are you Team Peeta or Team Gale?

THANK YOU.

swoon

Who was like “okay this time round we’re not subscribing to that crap when we talk to the press” because so far every interview has been great for this

With the beard he looks kinda like my friend Matt…except 20 times hotter…and Matt is super hot.

Also, great answer…

And He’s Super Hot

And I love the way they refuse to let this story be framed like Twilight. 

20x Super Hot

Source: a-world-of-our-very-own

7th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Wandering Lost and Free with 381,754 notes

piertotum-locomottor:

little-red-riding-cock:

brispeak:

Post-It Notes from a Stay-At-Home Dad.

These were all very entertaining :P

I love how he calls his wife “permanent roommate”

at least my coworker is hot

Source: lohanofficial

7th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Wandering Lost and Free with 154,514 notes

phan4lyf:

fantasticsteve:

allonsyassbutt:

bad-doctorwho-wolf:

friendly reminder that they had to keep reshooting this because Matt kept kissing back…

Well look at that middle one. Weeeoooooo.

DOOOOOOWWEEEEEEOOOOOOHHHH

I’ve been looking for this everywhere

Source: dlittleone

7th December 2013

Post reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 218,163 notes

perksofahunter:

fat-grrrl:

sometimes I forget that Americans have to pay for university upfront like what the fuck is that are u guys ok

No we’re not okay. 

We’re not okay at all. 

Source: radfemale

7th December 2013

Video reblogged from the jazzier virgin with 243,073 notes

luvurz:

tyleroakley:

dreamofmetonight:

This is how you shed the Disney image.

This looks really good.

shit

Source: youreworsethannicotine

7th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Powerful Fire Demon with 261,055 notes

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

Source: creepylittleworld